Kabali Music Review: Santhosha Magizhchi !

‘Nee vaa thozha’, in those powerfully asserted words, starts the opening ‘Ulagam Oruvanukka’ song with a very clearly ‘oruvan oruvan mudhalali’(Muthu) inspired beat. The beat slowly also changes to a more ‘maro maro’(Boys) beat, but inspirations aside let us see how the graph of the song proceeds. Sa Na (Short hereafter for Santhosh Narayanan) himself starts the vocals and you do have initial jitters if whether a relatively less experienced singer like him can do justice to the enormous duty of delivering a superstar intro song. The song has a steadily energetic feel to it with good chorus and strong lyrics. The lyrics till the first whistle are pretty straightforward hero worship stuff with a small dose of anti-establishment flavor. The nice Hollywood western type whistle, followed by a slightly awkward ‘Kabali’ chant give way to a totally different ball game though. This is also just the time at which the song clearly says that Kabali has been a cage for long and is released into the nation now (cage- jail possibly????)Continue reading “Kabali Music Review: Santhosha Magizhchi !”

Irudhi Suttru Tamil Movie Review: No Knock Out This

“Do not meddle with the way I coach”, says Prabhu (R Madhavan) to the assistant coach. “If I had listened to you, she would be cleaning toilets like you do”, he says pointing out to the aspiring woman boxer Madhi (Ritika Singh). “I may be the one cleaning toilets, Sir” replies the assistant coach, played by the excellent Nasser. “But you are the one who stinks”, he retorts with arguably the best line written for Tamil cinema this year. (And the year has just begun!). It is, therefore, so very disappointing that Sudha Kongara(Story/Screenplay/Direction) and Arun Matheshwaran (dialogues) choose to punch below their weight and could get this brilliance  only occasionally transmitted on the screen. (But Sudha delivers as a filmmaker – more about that later).Continue reading “Irudhi Suttru Tamil Movie Review: No Knock Out This”

In Search of A.R.Rahman

There’s an interesting paragraph in Baradwaj Rangan‘s post about A.R. Rahman‘s music for “I“, Shankar‘s latest magnum opus where he tells how he feels that the album is wholly individual and free.   “Free from the constraints of Tamil cinema. Free from hewing to situations. Free to leap off a cliff and land on a passing cloud and float away for a while. Whatever you think of Shankar’s filmmaking, you have to give him this: he wields one hell of a hammer. He liberates Rahman.”

The greatest thing about art is that it affects everyone differently. It brings forth opinions and a deeper understanding of pop culture if not society as a whole. In many ways, A.R. Rahman is like Bob Dylan in the 60s. They both changed our general perception of a form of music till their arrival. Dylan changed songwriting, Rahman changed arrangements. And after a period of unparalleled adulation, they both became less prominent. If the last 3 years are any indication, Rahman’s throne has all but been captured by other musicians. Continue reading “In Search of A.R.Rahman”