Abhay/Aalavandhan (2001): Twenty years of Kamal Haasan’s Magic Realism

There are some films which you miss, despite they hype and your eagerness to watch it. I remember Abhay/Aalavandhan was one of the most awaited films but it meet with mixed reactions when released. But it is a film which always comes up in discussion with cinephiles.Continue reading “Abhay/Aalavandhan (2001): Twenty years of Kamal Haasan’s Magic Realism”

The Hateful Eight: A Quick Review

The Hateful EightIf ever a camera was the hero in a movie, then this is it! The ‘antique’ Ultra Panavision 70mm  camera used by Quentin Tarantino in ‘ Hateful Eight’ and last used in 1966, has created ripples not just in the film industry, but also does so in the hearts of the audience. If ever there was a poetic opening scene with a cinematography to match for, then this is it. If ever the music score in the beginning hauntingly tells you what to expect in the end, then this is it!Continue reading “The Hateful Eight: A Quick Review”

Sony DADC releases ‘Children of War’ on home video

Home Entertainment Services by Sony DADC’, India’s leading home entertainment content provider, releases Hindi drama film ‘Children of War’ on DVD & VCD. ‘Children of War – Nine Months to Freedom’ released in theatres on 16th of May 2014 in India and  Bangladesh that garnered huge international critical acclaim for uncovering the veiled subject of the 1971 Genocide by the Pakistani Army.Consequently, many viewers wrote letters of support for the war crime victims to the United Nations, the House of Commons United Kingdom, the United States Congress and the European Parliament asking them to take note of the film and lend support to trial for justice against the war criminals.

Continue reading “Sony DADC releases ‘Children of War’ on home video”

The 14 Best-Loved Madaboutmoviez.com Articles of 2014

Happy 2015, it seems the world is still the same as we have people who want to ban films and books and in some cases kill cartoonists. It has been a great journey since the start of this portal,we have completed three years in 2014 and are still going strong. Thanks for your support and for reading our posts. In 2015 we hope to have even more better posts and continue our discussions on cinema across the world. For now we present you some of the best loved articles of 2014 which you people enjoyed.
Continue reading “The 14 Best-Loved Madaboutmoviez.com Articles of 2014”

Bill’s Got a Heart… Like a Rock Cast In The Sea…

Bill:         “You’re not a bad person. You’re a terrific person. You’re my favourite person. But every once in a while… You can be a real cunt.”

              “How do I look?”

Kiddo:     “You look ready”

This is the final conversation that Bill and Beatrix Kiddo have before they part. And they part for good.Continue reading “Bill’s Got a Heart… Like a Rock Cast In The Sea…”

Life Of Crime (2014) Movie Review: Unflustered, Undelightful Con

Language : English | Running Time :99 Minutes | Director : Daniel Schechter

A film based on an Elmore Leaonrd novel. The first thought that comes to mind is Quentin Tarantino’s now cult classic “Jackie Brown”, a film based on “Rum Punch”. It gave us two memorable screen cons – Ordell Robbie played by an excellent Samuel L. Jackson and Louis Gara (Robert De Niro). “Life Of Crime”, based on “The Switch” brings back the characters in their Detroit years, 1978 to be exact. But this time we don’t have the great Samuel L. Jackson and Robert De Niro but Yasiin Bey, a.k.a Mos Def and John Hawkes respectively. Tarantino’s chops are tried on by Daniel Schechter. These are major steps down but these are not what really affect the film.Continue reading “Life Of Crime (2014) Movie Review: Unflustered, Undelightful Con”

Revolver Rani Movie Review : Experimental, Brave but Flawed

Revolver Rani is a hard film to judge and critique. It is a black comedy, and a sly one at that. It is an audacious and ambitious attempt. It is also marginally regressive at times. It is a slushy ode to Quentin Tarantino’s Kill Bill series, not that those were classics either. It is the feminine version of a diatribe of Anurag Kashyap’s Gangs of Wasseypur, in layman terms. It is a lot of things. But then, it is nothing like what its trailer promised it to be. Revolver Rani delves much deeper, darker and quirkier than a plain badass female dacoit beating up goons story. Yet in those finer reserves, it loses itself somewhere and leaves you confused. It must be lauded, but alas, it cannot be archived even if all of ye Kangana fans may have wanted to, especially after the release of Queen.

Continue reading “Revolver Rani Movie Review : Experimental, Brave but Flawed”

Edgar Wright: Cornetto, Pints & Friendships

Edgar Wright
Edgar Wright

Edgar Wright is a Writer/Director from UK. Most of the average moviegoers might not know who he is,  but for some of us movie zombies he is a fresh meat,whom we can’t get enough of. Edgar Wright is one of the few geniuses who still makes movies which has immense repeat value (which rarely happens today wherein “One time watch” is the new motto for 100 crore success) just to make sure that you squeeze out every bit of fun. Most of his films are drugs that you feel blessed to be addicted to. It has so much to offer and every time you re-watch you tend to notice little nuances and references that you might have missed the last time.

Edgar Wright started his career with A Fistful of Fingers (1995) which in his own words is not the greatest thing that he ever made  and burst out laughing while confessing this. But learning what not to do while making  that confession ,he moved on to doing a TV series one of which is Spacedan absolute brilliant sitcom which paved the way to what will turn out to be “The Cornetto Trilogy“. The first of which is Shaun Of The Dead. Edgar’s storytelling style is fast & zappy. He is like Quentin Tarantino on crack. One of the reasons for the repeat value is the insane style of unveiling details because when you watch it you might miss something with all the multiple camera cuts & quick exchange of words. Even a simple bar conversation is not spared, it has multiple camera cuts and rapid exchange of words.  But it’s done with so much finesse that you will rarely be distracted by it and mostly you will be on track. What is credible is that despite the amount of multiple cuts that is used in a scene, you rarely miss a expression of an actor or a moment, every bit is captured. Also, the conversation seem so spontaneous but all of it is rehearsed 2-3 weeks before the shooting actually begins which makes it look all so easy.

His stories have a very unique way of unveiling always hinting about what it eventually is going be about. Like in Shaun Of The Dead the news broadcast, the man eating a bird while Shaun’s traveling in the bus, it is always teasing you. It generally takes the end of first act to say viola that’s the direction its going to go into. Be it in The World’s End which while at the end of first act you do fully realize that it is a alien’s invading, same is the case with Scott Pilgrim Vs. the World, Hot Fuzz and The World’s End. This is one of the points that binds this Trilogy is well apart from of course friendship, pints cornetto & comedy which eventually merges the movies Shaun Of The Dead(Zom-Com) Hot Fuzz (Action/Comedy) & The World’s End (Sci-Fi/Comedy). He’s very old fashioned in a way that he keeps film-making very simple yet creatively it’s original, fresh and cool to watch without spending 250-300 million and yet technically it makes all the right noises.

To be frank, his movies are in a way a parody of different genres. Yet it is not  is insulting in anyway nor is it unintentionally

Scott Pilgrim vs The World
Scott Pilgrim vs The World

funny. He is always on the mark and the main reason for that is the Story/Screenplay which is tight and is slightly more tilted towards being a  homage rather than a parody. The guy has a  passion for Cinema & Pop culture and this  is visible in all his films through the homage and references especially in Scott Pilgrim Vs. the World . In fact, he is the  first to admit that he is influenced and inspired by a lot of movies and he watches a lot of movies before beginning the scripting process, yet what you see on screen is so Edgar.

What never ceases to amaze you is that, though his movie might have a high dose of humor but sometimes it hardly has any dialogues. By just looking at their antics you burst out laughing. The prime example was Scott Pilgrim Vs. the World , the films captions were funnier than the dialogues. It is easily one of the busiest film I have seen given the fact that there is so much happening simultaneously. That being said the emotional content is rare as they are still pitched out perfectly without it being jarring and forced resulting in some of the more memorable scenes. The scene of Shaun killing his mom in Shaun Of The Dead comes straight to mind. Creating an impacting emotional scene in a primarily a comedy film is risky,  it’s like you’re watching a scene where heroine is about to strip and the power cuts off as she’s about to drop her clothes. Where Edgar gets it right in terms of dark passage is that it he always builds it up from the start of the movie rather than just being a random scene to add that serious touch.

Shaun of the Dead
Shaun of the Dead

Be it his relationship with his mother & Nick in Shaun Of The Dead or the issues that Nick has with his father in Hot Fuzz, or Simon’s obsession of staying in the past in The World’s End. You always know that at some point in the turn of events this emotion will be unleashed and when it does, it is handled in such a mature and dark way that you almost feel you’re all of a sudden watching something completely different. One thing about Edgar is he doesn’t hold back for anything, if he does something he will make sure that it is laid out perfectly in terms of color tones, atmosphere and brutality.

The brutality of course comes from the heavily violent action set pieces. It is gory, bloody, messy but beautifully crafted on celluloid. Be it the tight shooting sequence in Hot Fuzz to the WWE kind of fight sequence in The World’s End or the most artistic and beautiful masterpiece kind of video games meets comic book meets Da Vinci kinda action sequence in Scott Pilgrim Vs. the World. They are constantly evolving in terms of action sequences as well and not surprisingly something new crops up.

There are elements of films that we love and the elements which we just can’t forget and the quick cut editing is something that is just signature Edgar Wright. Guy Ritchie was the dude who got us hooked to those quick zappy editing patterns. But, Edgar just seems to have made it his own. He uses it not just to make it funny and stylish but primarily to jump through narration and get the pace of the story going, but also uses it very effectively in a conversation.

The World's End
The World’s End

It is such an effective manner to move the story forward but if not done right it can feel unwanted. But the way it is done in Edgar’s film it is right on the mark and you wait for it to come in his films. It has become his signature of sorts in his films. Also it suits his style of filmmaking as it is always at a pace and the quick editing style gels together beautifully.

He bought back old school style of film-making with a modern twist where stories are still a core of a film, yet he has diversified technically, stylishly and manages to entertain us in very creative and unforgettable way. He has now moved on to bigger things after coming to Hollywood. Edgar’s next is supposedly Ant-Man but the one that has really caught my attention is a full fledged horror feature minus any comedy that he is planning with Bad”J. J. Abrams”Robot. Big industry and big studios comes with its own baggage and I hope that he won’t succumb to it and will manage to keep the honesty and creativity intact with which he makes his films.

My Week with Westerns – High Noon

Here’s the first part of the series that celebrates Westerns and the recent Django Unchained release.

Fred Zinnemann’s High Noon is full of tropes, dialogues and yes, of course the shootouts that define westerns but the order in which we see these elements makes it all the more special.Continue reading “My Week with Westerns – High Noon”