Serious Men (2020 Netflix Original) Movie Review: The Angst of India’s Voiceless

Serious Men releases at a time, when the Uttar Pradesh state machinery has gone all out and try to cover up the Hathras tragedy that has been in the headlines of late. It is also interesting that it comes at a time when filmmakers like Pa. Ranjith and Nagaraj Manjule are giving voice to the Dalits of India. 

Serious Men is based on the novel of the same name by Manu Joseph. It tracks the journey of resourceful Ayyan Mani (Nawazuddin Siddiqui) who works at a prestigious scientific organisation in Mumbai as a PA for his boss Acharya (Naseer). Both come from different class and different caste while Ayan is from the lower caste, his boss belongs to the uppermost caste.Continue reading “Serious Men (2020 Netflix Original) Movie Review: The Angst of India’s Voiceless”

Bombay (1995): Mani Ratnam’s ode to the city that never sleeps

Bombay now Mumbai, was a city considered to be a cosmopolitan city, a city which was only concerned about making money and not interested in knowing from where you have come from or who were you.  Post ’92, the fault line has run deeply with ghettos that are now an integral part of my city.  For a city which is the epicenter of Bollywood, there are hardly any movies based on ’92 riots. The one which comes to my mind are Bombay and Black Friday, both coincidentally directed by people by non natives. Continue reading “Bombay (1995): Mani Ratnam’s ode to the city that never sleeps”

Solo Movie Review: Visceral, Vicious, Visual, Vibrant

There is a certain synchronicity to the elements, that can’t be described with words, but can only be experienced, and the same can be said about Bejoy Nambiar’s works. Right from Shaitan, David or Wazir, it is quite evident that he is a rare breed of filmmaker who enjoys experimenting with content, visuals and storytelling tropes. Solo can be termed as a homecoming of sorts, considering that it is the first time he’s narrating a tale in his own tongue, Malayalam. However, the real question is, does Solo finally find balance between form and content, the balance that has been sorely missing in his previous efforts?Continue reading “Solo Movie Review: Visceral, Vicious, Visual, Vibrant”

Re-presenting The Epic Characters in the Film Franchise, Baahubali

Rajamouli’s two-part epic film – Baahubali broke many-a-record in Indian film industry. So much is written and said about the film – its cast, storyline, special visual effects, settings, dialogue, music, costumes, stunts, and more than all about the amount spent on the movie and the records that they broke in box-office collections. The use of new technologies has no doubt enhanced the quality and the visual impact of the film. But what appears to have touched the hearts of the viewers the most is the art of narrating the story.  Millions of viewers queued up in the theatres to find satisfactory answer to the one question that agitated their minds since the release of the first part of Baahubali two years back. It is enough to view the film once to get the answer for the question, “Why did Kattappa kill Baahubali?”. More than the answer to the question, the film attracted repeat audience and sustained the viewership mostly because of the emotions that the lead characters in the film could arouse. Continue reading “Re-presenting The Epic Characters in the Film Franchise, Baahubali”

Baahubali 2: The Conclusion Movie Review: Where Dreams are Mightier than the Sword!

If this man demands a 100 crore to make a movie adaptation of ‘The Hare and the Tortoise’, you can hand over that money to S.S. Rajamouli.  For you know he will not change a damn thing about the tale and still come up with an epic cinematic experience. For in Rajamouli, you can trust!Continue reading “Baahubali 2: The Conclusion Movie Review: Where Dreams are Mightier than the Sword!”

The Ghazi Attack Movie Review: Thunder Down Under

It is rather surprising that with all the war movies that have been made in India, not one has ever focused on our naval forces, let alone one set in a submarine. Therefore, the promos of The Ghazi Attack brought with them a sense of intrigue. When one thinks of movies set on a submarine, the mind goes to the dark and claustrophobic Das Boot, the tense Cold War thriller, The Hunt for Red October, the gripping Crimson Tide, and the classic, Run Silent Run Deep. The question here is, can debutant director Sankalp Reddy make an impact, through the narration of a war tale, long forgotten, the tale of the sinking of PNS Ghazi?Continue reading “The Ghazi Attack Movie Review: Thunder Down Under”

Dhruva Movie Review: Two Different Sides of the Same Coin

Know your enemies and know yourself and you can fight a hundred battles without disaster- Sun Tzu

I am reminded of this quote after watching Surender Reddy’s latest Telugu film Dhruva and not just because the film actually even refers to the quote in its own way.  I have always believed that a real hero, a formidable one whom we can look up to is someone who has been really tested by an adversary worthy enough of his/her calibre. And this definitely applies to a hero in an action film, remove the antagonist or make him/her weak or not so worthy and there’s nothing so unique in having a dashing hero, even if the person is larger than life. Take any action film as an example and try to apply this principle, leaving aside exceptions I am sure majority of the films which really worked and stayed put in your minds definitely had a powerful antagonist as well. Continue reading “Dhruva Movie Review: Two Different Sides of the Same Coin”

Kabali Movie Review: Rajini’s Swag is Intact, But the Film Needed More than That

In a scene from Pa.Ranjith’s Kabali we see an ageing gangster attend a graduation ceremony at a rehabilitation centre which is close to his heart. Kabaleeshwaran (Rajinikanth) is recently out of jail after 25 years and is still trying to find out some answers. The students ask him various questions, on his past life-how he became a gangster, how he landed up in jail, about his marriage etc. One of them, Meena (Riythvika) even asks as to how did Kumudhavalli (Radhika Apte) fall in love with a dark looking guy like him and pat comes the reply that it’s all about the power of black colour. Now this seemingly simple dialogue is what makes it fun to watch a Rajini film, the fans love it and even the others will certainly smile on hearing this. Cut to another scene, this time in a 5 star hotel room in Chennai where Kabali and his daughter Yogi (Dhansika) are startled to hear the doorbell ring quite a few times, only to realise that the person at the door is none other than their local support provider.Continue reading “Kabali Movie Review: Rajini’s Swag is Intact, But the Film Needed More than That”

Kabali: A Quick Review

 

Kabali Poster 10It is confirmed now that this is Kalyug: Tarzan is a family man, Superman is emotional, Batman spends more time with his girlfriend and Rajinikant has become old!!! I always thought age can never catch up with Rajini, only Rajini can catch up with age (my original :P). But Pa. Ranjith (director of Kabali) has proved me wrong. For our consolation, he has given us Radhika Apte as Kabali’s wife and Dhansika in one of her hottest roles.

Kabali (Rajini) is the ‘Robinhood Don’ of the Tamils in Malaysia as he takes over from his godfather (Naseer) and fights Tony (Winston Chao). But unlike Marlon Brando who plots and kills slyly, Kabali believes in style- driving over his opponents or shooting them on a billiards table. After all, his wife has been killed and he is looking for vendetta after being released from prison.Continue reading “Kabali: A Quick Review”