Why the Haider debate on anti-nationalism is misplaced!

Ever since the release of the third film in Vishal Bharadwaj’s Shakespeare trilogy “Haider”, there has been a lot of debate about the movie’s ostensible representation of the Indian Army as the villain in the 1990s disturbance in the Kashmir valley. While there has been less dispute about the artistic merit of the film, viewers have been equivocal about the way Haider decides to perceive the then government and the armed forces, which include the Kashmir police and the Indian Army. It is no news now that a lot of people on Twitter had called for boycotting the film for the mere reason that they found the portrayal of the Army disdainful.Continue reading “Why the Haider debate on anti-nationalism is misplaced!”

Haider Movie Review: Love-ed

Sometimes it is so difficult to collect all the thoughts to write a review for a movie. What do I do then? I ask myself. Us Bhakts of Bhardwaj get swept away, most of the times, in blind faith. But the truth is, there is no way you can ignore the reality, as I learnt while I was talking to Sethu. The truth, in all of its probability is, that this Vishal Bhardwaj’s masterpiece…is not aberration free.  There are things in the plot that call for an unwelcome “what a coincidence.” There are things that call for an unwelcome “really?” moment. I mean how do you respond to a thing that’d happen – even in the context of the movie—but won’t because it’s a movie, based on a play — so there are events pending to happen? How do you respond to characters that exist because…well, it’s convenient for the storyteller? And no, I am not talking about Irrfan Khan’s Roohdaar (without trying to spoil anything.) There are coincidences, and character decisions — and yes they can happen, but! — But that jarred. Because it felt like some kind of an easy make-shift solution to drive the movie forward. That makes things look superficial. It takes away the gravity from a scenario otherwise really intense. It hinders seamless involvement.Continue reading “Haider Movie Review: Love-ed”

Haider (2014) Movie Review: The Return Of The Bard

Language : Hindi | Running Time : 162 Minutes | Director : Vishal Bhardwaj 

Irrfan Khan as Roohdhar, making a special appearance, dressed in white and sporting black goggles, walks onto the screen, mist clearing and I was reminded of a heroine walking into a hero’s life in our movies from the 80s. If not the same, the scene surely brings a similar effect on us. We are left gasping at the majestic beauty of the shot, the exhilarating bass and electric guitars of “Aao Na” announcing his presence. It is right there with some of the best intros I’ve seen in Indian cinema, because it elevates a simple intro into one filled with mystery and a desire to follow the man ourselves. It is something that draws whistles, claps and heightens our frenzy and Vishal Bhardwaj’s “Haider” will ask you the question, “To be or not to be” in every scene it throws at you.Continue reading “Haider (2014) Movie Review: The Return Of The Bard”

Haider: Trailer

Haider Poster 1After adapting William Shakespeare‘s Macbeth into Maqbool and Othello into Omkara , Vishal Bhardwaj is now ready with his third film under his Shakespeare trilogy, Haider which is based on Hamlet. Produced by Vishal and UTV, the film is written by Vishal himself and Basharat Peer. Based in Kashmir the film has an ensemble star cast comprising of Shahid Kapur, Shraddha Kapoor, Tabu, Kay Kay Menon, Irrfan Khan, Aamir Bashir, Kulbhushan Kharbanda, Ashish Vidyarthi etc. Of course the music is by Vishal while the lyrics are by Gulzar. Pankaj Kumar is the DOP and Aarif Sheikh the editor of the film.Continue reading “Haider: Trailer”